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Hedges, fences, walls, containerized plantings, parterres, flowering borders—all can be used to create outdoor rooms.Your home strikes the perfect balance between aesthetics and functionality. Not only is it tastefully furnished and accessorized, but it offers the ultimate in comfort and hospitality. Can you say the same about the rest of your property, namely, your outdoor landscape?

People have long appreciated the pleasures of external environments: the word "garden" derives from the Anglo Saxon gyrdon, which means "to enclose," and the Persian word "paradise" translates to "walled enclosure." Hedges, fences, walls, containerized plantings, parterres, flowering borders—all can be used to designate outdoor rooms. These spaces create a sense of privacy and security, yet are open to a greater natural beauty.

Louis uses the existing architectural form of your property to shape its exterior rooms.

Louis uses the existing architectural form of your property to shape its exterior rooms: a building and courtyard that balance each other, a garden room whose forms are echoed in the garden, a balcony that animates the patio below—these illustrate the balance and beauty brought to landscape design by coherence, comfort and allure.

The pool surround, itself surrounded by plantings.

Well-designed external environments, shaped by the architecture they serve, not only increase property value, but provide enduring pleasure. Truly soul-stirring architecture answers our need for extended, fully realized and harmonious shelter—both indoors and out.

Walls are so necessary for gardens, that even to multiply them, I make as many little gardens as I can in the neighborhood of the great one, whereby I have not only all-fruits or espaliers and shelter, which is very considerable; but am also thereby enabled to correct some defects and irregularities which render the garden disagreeable.—De La Quintinye
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